Bakaratinian Legacy in Nature

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Vesko
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Bakaratinian Legacy in Nature

Post: # 216Post Vesko »

See the newly added photo/illustration on Tom's site about the plant xanthorrhoea mentioned in the book as one of the vestiges of the distant times, according to the book a legacy of the yellow and especially the black Bakaratinians:

http://www.thiaoouba.com/xanthorrhoea.htm

Page 36 of the online book at http://www.thiaoouba.com/ebook.htm reads:
'The black race persevered in its endeavours and finally succeeded in growing the plant, but it had taken so long that the kangaroos no longer required more than their new pastures. Very much later, some arilu plants took root and, as there were no animals to eat them, they spread throughout Australia. They still exist under the botanical name Xanthorrhoea and the popular name "grass trees"'.
Here's the editor's comment:
1. "grass trees" - original text was "black boys". This term is currently avoided in Australia due to the racist connotation. (Editor's comment)
Furthermore, and as you can see on the photo:
'On Earth, this grass grows much taller and thicker than it did on Bakaratini, but that often happens when species are introduced from other planets. This plant is one of the rare vestiges of those distant times.'
Still furthermore:
'It indicates, by being found only in Australia, along with the kangaroo, that the Bakaratinians remained in that particular part of the planet for a very long time before seeking to colonise other parts. I am about to explain this, but I wanted first, to cite the examples of the kangaroo and the Xanthorrhoea so that you might better understand all the problems of adaptation these people had to overcome; of course, it is only one small example among so many others.'
The plant indeed looks very strange, what do you think?
Last edited by Vesko on Sun Jun 20, 2004 11:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Marcus
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Post: # 233Post Marcus »

The one pictured is immense.
Where I live they are extremely common and I am so used to them that they do not look unusual to me at all.

Usually the grass tree had a very long protrusion growing from the middle which I assume is used to pollunate.

I have found that they seem to thrive (as with most Australian bush) when they are burnt back.

Transplanting them is a very delicate operation. In most cases they are bought from a nursery for AUD 300. The high price is an insurance/replacement factor, that is to say that if it dies within a certain time frame, the nursery will replace.

I can imagine the Bakaratinians had HUGE troubles in growing the plant.
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Vesko
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Post: # 237Post Vesko »

Marcus Collins wrote:Transplanting them is a very delicate operation. In most cases they are bought from a nursery for AUD 300. The high price is an insurance/replacement factor, that is to say that if it dies within a certain time frame, the nursery will replace.
Your comment should be added to Tom's one.
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Post: # 455Post Kestrel »

There are lots of alien species here on earth. It seems, that no matter where we live we see every day. Completly clueless to the fact.

Come to think, there are some pretty unusual fish that populate the waters of the world .
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Post: # 458Post Vesko »

The banana tree has no real stem (stem only made up of leaves and is hollow, leaves growing out of it), so this tree is more a perennial grass than a tree. I wonder if this is related, since it could be said it is a grass tree, too, and according to the Book it is also imported from Bakaratini. Although later the Bakaratinians found bananas in Africa, they were almost inedible because they contained large seeds. In any case, the bananas that we eat today appear to be from Bakaratini.
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Kestrel
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Post: # 468Post Kestrel »

There are so many types of bananas though. Yellow ones, red ones big yellows small yellows, greens small red ones. Quite a few varations.
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Marcus
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Post: # 3049Post Marcus »

Vesko wrote:
Marcus Collins wrote:Transplanting them is a very delicate operation. In most cases they are bought from a nursery for AUD 300. The high price is an insurance/replacement factor, that is to say that if it dies within a certain time frame, the nursery will replace.
Your comment should be added to Tom's one.
10 to 15 were transplanted about a year ago at a redeveloped train station. All have perished.
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Zark
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Post: # 3059Post Zark »

I don't know, but Manta Ray's sure *look* like they belong on another planet:
http://www.oceanlight.com/html/manta_birostris.html
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Post: # 3060Post Marcus »

Zark wrote:I don't know, but Manta Ray's sure *look* like they belong on another planet:
http://www.oceanlight.com/html/manta_birostris.html
They are a cousin of the shark. I do agree they look out of this world :D

How about the Platypus?
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Zark
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Post: # 3061Post Zark »

Marcus wrote:They are a cousin of the shark. I do agree they look out of this world :D
I hear a shark's skeleton is composed of cartilage instead of bone.

* Check out this crazy shark egg :
http://www.amonline.net.au/fishes/fishf ... eatus5.htm

* these baby sharks cannibalise their mothers eggs.. and get very fat :O :
http://www.amonline.net.au/fishes/stude ... oophag.htm
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Marcus
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Post: # 3062Post Marcus »

* these baby sharks cannibalise their mothers eggs.. and get very fat :O :
http://www.amonline.net.au/fishes/stude ... oophag.htm
HA! I can imagine they would roll around on the bottom of the ocean in that state :!:
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Post: # 3075Post VeskoP »

*** is that? The second distended stomach seems like totally beyond return to normal size, but I guess nature must know better.
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Post: # 3076Post Robanan »

Let's just imagine if all those eggs would turn into adult sharks 8-[
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Re: Bakaratinian Legacy in Nature

Post: # 11107Post Rezo »

wanna get back to xanthorrhoea, and grass trees - would have posted in recent thread mentioning nutritional foods of ancient australia - but chose to mention here as this is slightly different but related subject:

australia is not the only place w/grass trees. So, I can either look at it as, only the particular one[s] 'they' brought to earth are in 'australia' [australia/indonesia/new guinea/malaysia/phillipines[?]/antarctica at the time?], or species got planted elsewhere.

This link [and just looking outside sometimes where I'm at!] shows grass 'trees' of mexico and the southwest. Learning about my new climate as I go...

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1367 [scroll down to comparison w/xanthorrhoea quadrangularis and Dasylirion longissiumum]
" There is a single general space, a single vast immensity which we may freely call void: in it are unnumerable globes like this on which we live and grow, this space we declare to be infinite, since neither reason, convenience, sense-perception nor nature assign to it a limit."

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